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Atheist, for lack of a better word
10-25-2009, 04:35 PM (This post was last modified: 05-01-2013 04:44 AM by StarStuff.)
Post: #1
Atheist, for lack of a better word
Hello, all.

My name is StarStuff.

I am an atheist, for lack of a better word. I have described my beliefs to a number of people, and some people call it agnosticism while others call it atheism. I believe that it is possible that God exists -- in the same way it's possible that the sasquatch, the chupacabras, the flying spaghetti monster, and Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry exist. You can never prove a negative, and thus we can never know for certain that there is no God, but faced with no compelling evidence either way, I assume there is no God until I am presented with compelling evidence to the contrary.

However, I find religion to be a fascinating area of discussion, as it tends to bring so many great realms of human research together. History, sociology, psychology, and philosophy, just to name a few. To discuss religion is to discuss the very nature of the human mind, our origins, and our very existance. It is a great mental exercise which, like most philosophy, may not have any concrete importance, but makes for fascinating and enlightening discussion.

Anyway, hope to satisfy my constant longing for engaging debate and discussion here.
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10-25-2009, 05:46 PM
Post: #2
RE: Atheist, for lack of a better word
Welcome to the forum. Hope you enjoy talking to us.
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10-25-2009, 06:03 PM
Post: #3
RE: Atheist, for lack of a better word
10 points from Gryffindor, Mr. Taucer, for your unconvincing display of loyalty for Hogwarts.

But seriously, good to have you. Always nice to have another atheist around.

I'm back baby! Thanks for everyone who sent me PMs asking what had happened to me.
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10-26-2009, 06:07 AM
Post: #4
RE: Atheist, for lack of a better word
Hello, welcome to the forum. Big Grin

The person that is truly happy is not the one who gets everything they want, but the one who learns to be happy with what they have.
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10-26-2009, 10:04 AM
Post: #5
RE: Atheist, for lack of a better word
(10-25-2009 04:35 PM)Geoffrey Taucer Wrote:  I am an atheist, for lack of a better word. I have described my beliefs to a number of people, and some people call it agnosticism while others call it atheism. I believe that it is possible that God exists -- in the same way it's possible that the sasquatch, the chupacabras, the flying spaghetti monster, and Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry exist. You can never prove a negative, and thus we can never know for certain that there is no God, but faced with no compelling evidence either way, I assume there is no God until I am presented with compelling evidence to the contrary.

The distinction between atheist and agnsotic has been endlessly debated to little point, IMO. To me an atheist is a person who when asked an opinion of whether there is a God will say, "No". An agnostic will say, "I don't know." They may each add qualifying details but will generally start off with those short summaries.

I am technically an agnostic since I canot give a Yes/No answer. But I believe that the question is ultimately meaningless. Short summary: What does it mean for the reason for existence to exist or not exist? How does one logically demonstrate the existence of the source of lawfulness? Rolleyes

(10-25-2009 04:35 PM)Geoffrey Taucer Wrote:  However, I find religion to be a fascinating area of discussion, as it tends to bring so many great realms of human research together. History, sociology, psychology, and philosophy, just to name a few. To discuss religion is to discuss the very nature of the human mind, our origins, and our very existance. It is a great mental exercise which, like most philosophy, may not have any concrete importance, but makes for fascinating and enlightening discussion.

Agreed. Welcome! Big Grin
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01-10-2010, 11:30 PM
Post: #6
RE: Atheist, for lack of a better word
"I assume there is no God until I am presented with compelling evidence to the contrary". i fully agree with you, that noone evn those who are the most faithful has seen God, but the fact that we don't see or touch, breath or listen to that God, that God doesn't exist. All the signs that we witness and see day and night wherever we are , reflect that god exist, sees and hears everything. "There is only One God," the Creator, the Sustainer of everything-- known in the Arabic language and by Muslims as Allah. Everything , creation , material , animal, human being and other creation shall accept God and shall be submitted to God ( this is the meaning of Islam), the creator of the Worlds
the Creator of the material. please read Coran to have better idea of who is our God. Our God says in the chapter of "opening" :In the name of Allah, Most Gracious, Most Merciful.

2. Praise be to Allah, the Cherisher and Sustainer of the worlds;

3. Most Gracious, Most Merciful;

4. Master of the Day of Judgment.

5. Thee do we worship, and Thine aid we seek.

6. Show us the straight way,

7. The way of those on whom Thou hast bestowed Thy Grace, those whose (portion) is not wrath, and who go not astray.
Our God Allah says in another chapter called "the Unity":
Say: He is Allah, the One;

2. Allah, the Eternal, Absolute;

3. He begetteth not, nor is He begotten;

4. And there is none like unto Him.
Regards my friends
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01-17-2010, 02:02 PM
Post: #7
RE: Atheist, for lack of a better word
Geoffrey Taucer

Hi

This is your thread and you choose the theme and flow of comments on this thread.

I just read your starting post as I am trying to know different members on the Forum better and was intrigued by your post. I would lik to fully understand what may be the underlying reasons, for your interest in religion. You have mentioned a reason, but just a friendly question, could the real reason be that human nature is always seeking communion with its Creator? I have posted part of one of my posts in 'Why atheists pray when a plane hits turbulence?' for your benefit here. Just some food for thought, not an argument. Think about it now or a few years later.


I do not agree with Trinitarian views of CS Lewis, but when he is right in my opinion, I have no qualms in quoting him. I am borrowing from Armand Nicholi Jr.:

"He notes in his autobiography that as an atheist his strongest wish was that God not exist. Lewis wanted no one to interfere with his life. "No word in my vocabulary expressed deeper hatred than the word Interference," he wrote in Surprised by Joy. And he found himself acutely aware that the Old and New Testaments "placed at the center what seemed to me a transcendental Interferer." Atheism appealed to Lewis be¬cause it satisfied his deep-seated wish to be left alone. Lewis says that Freud's clinical observations tell us something about our thoughts and feelings-but that those feelings may involve either a wish for or a wish against God's existence. Freud failed to follow through with his own observations.
Lewis takes his argument a step further. Not only does wishing for something not rule out the existence of the object wished for ¬it may itself be evidence for its existence. In his own life, Lewis ex¬perienced periodically a deep-seated desire that he called "joy" and that he eventually concluded was a desire for a relationship with his Creator. Lewis notes we usually possess desires for things which ex¬ist. He asserts that "Creatures are not born with desires unless sat¬isfaction for those desires exists. A baby feels hunger: well, there is such a thing as food. A duckling wants to swim: well, there is such a thing as water. Men feel sexual desire: well, there is such a thing as sex." He then implies we all have a deep-seated desire, or wish for, a relationship with the Creator and for an existence beyond this life, though we often mistake it for something else. Recent research by neuroscientists adds a twist here. Evidence exists that the hu¬man brain is "hardwired" (genetically programmed) for belief. Whether, if true, this wiring reflects Intelligence beyond the universe depends on one's worldview. As Lewis states, what we learn from evidence "depends on the kind of philosophy we bring" to the evidence.
Lewis writes: "If I find in myself a desire which no experience in this world can satisfy, the most probable explanation is' that I was made for another world." Lewis continues: "If none of my earthly pleasures satisfy it that does not prove that the universe is a fraud. Probably earthly pleasures were never meant to satisfy it, but only to arouse it, to suggest the real thing. If that is so, I must take care, on the one hand, never to despise, or be unthankful for, these earthly blessings, and on the other, never to mistake them for the something else of which they are only a kind of copy, or echo, or mirage."
Lewis relates this desire to one's purpose in life: "I must keep alive in myself the desire for my true country, which I shall not find till after death; I must never let it get snowed under or turned aside; I must make it the main object of life to press on to that other coun¬try and to help others to do the same."
In short: "All your life an unattainable ecstasy has hovered just beyond the grasp of your consciousness. The day is coming when you will wake to find, beyond all hope, that you have attained it, or else, that it was within your reach and you have lost it forever."

Freud recognized a similar desire in himself. He used the German word Sehnsucht, the same word Lewis uses to describe the de¬sire. In a paper published in 1899, Freud described a "longing" that haunted him all of his life. This longing he associated with a desire to walk ill the woods with his father, as he did as a child. He writes: "I believe now that I was never free from a longing for the beautiful woods near our home, in which. . . I used to run off from my father, almost before I had learnt to walk."

Just think about it please, what is so special about a walk in a forest?

(Armand M Nicholi Jr. CS Lewis and Freud: debate God, love, sex and meaning of life. Free Press 2002, page 46-47.)

I am second coming of Thomas Paine. If you are a Christian, have you read Age of Reason?
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