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Bikes, Horse racing and Kabbalah
05-19-2017, 06:23 PM (This post was last modified: 05-19-2017 06:54 PM by Yefet.)
Post: #101
RE: Bikes, Horse racing and Kabbalah
(05-19-2017 05:24 PM)Imprecise Interrupt Wrote:  
(05-19-2017 05:06 PM)Yefet Wrote:  ... whenever I post about Kabbalah its complete silence, or a standard repetitive retort ,that is except a few cricket chirps.

I do not recall seeing posts about Kabbalah. I am no expert in it but I have long been fascinated by the apparent relationship with the mathematics of Georg Cantor. Or is that too esoteric?

If I could explain this my way, it probably will not make sense. But that's never stopped me before.
Many Chasidic Kabbalist delve in numbers, gematria. It is what makes sense to them, and as it is with any concept, as long as it brings one to Chasidism or used to explain concepts in Chasidism then it is their personal Kabbalah. Cantor was very religious and used math as a tool for his personal understanding, but if used without the goal of bringing one closer to an understanding of Hashem then that's all it is mathematical concepts, personally as a son of a Kabbalist I was taught that anything, in my case the Sefirat, that lead to an understanding of Chasidism and Judaism is my Kabbalah as they say to each his own capability's and understanding, in other words math is not my thing and all I see is numbers and understand the concept but in reality never understood how or why adding or subtracting the value of a Hebrew letter, and finding ways of adding or subtracting to equal another set of numbers has anything to do with anything (over my head)
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05-19-2017, 07:43 PM
Post: #102
RE: Bikes, Horse racing and Kabbalah
(05-19-2017 06:23 PM)Yefet Wrote:  
(05-19-2017 05:24 PM)Imprecise Interrupt Wrote:  
(05-19-2017 05:06 PM)Yefet Wrote:  ... whenever I post about Kabbalah its complete silence, or a standard repetitive retort ,that is except a few cricket chirps.

I do not recall seeing posts about Kabbalah. I am no expert in it but I have long been fascinated by the apparent relationship with the mathematics of Georg Cantor. Or is that too esoteric?

If I could explain this my way, it probably will not make sense. But that's never stopped me before.
Many Chasidic Kabbalist delve in numbers, gematria. It is what makes sense to them, and as it is with any concept, as long as it brings one to Chasidism or used to explain concepts in Chasidism then it is their personal Kabbalah. Cantor was very religious and used math as a tool for his personal understanding, but if used without the goal of bringing one closer to an understanding of Hashem then that's all it is mathematical concepts, personally as a son of a Kabbalist I was taught that anything, in my case the Sefirat, that lead to an understanding of Chasidism and Judaism is my Kabbalah as they say to each his own capability's and understanding, in other words math is not my thing and all I see is numbers and understand the concept but in reality never understood how or why adding or subtracting the value of a Hebrew letter, and finding ways of adding or subtracting to equal another set of numbers has anything to do with anything (over my head)

Gematria has nothing to do with Cantor. Georg Cantor invented set theory, although it has grown well beyond his original formulation. He did extensive work on infinite sets such as the set of counting numbers and the larger set of real numbers and the infinite cascade of larger infinities. It is when he tried to deal with the idea of the set of all sets that things got interesting. This would be the Absolute Infinite, beyond all other infinities.

Cantor considered this Absolute Infinite to be God. This supposed 'set of all sets' cannot be a set, because if it were a larger set could be constructed from it (a basic theorem of set theory). For Cantor, God contains all possibilities but cannot be contained. A set is that which satisfies a description, the form of a possible thought. To describe what God is would be to limit God to that description, which would be a set. But God (Cantor’s Absolute infinite) cannot be a set. One must say that God is not any thing. Since a set is the form of a possible thought and God cannot be contained in a set, God cannot be conceived. But all the things we can conceive, all the things we can deal with, are God.

That is what I am talking about.

We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them.
- Albert Einstein
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05-20-2017, 11:54 PM (This post was last modified: Yesterday 12:13 AM by Yefet.)
Post: #103
RE: Bikes, Horse racing and Kabbalah
Cantor used his mathematical skills and study as a way of explaining or justifying his religious beliefs, his way of understanding as much as one can, it was his Kabbalah, his enlightenment
Just as some Chazel used Gematria, some Sefirat, some the peshat, remez or drush, was speaking in general terms and not at all addressing his formula or method
It may interest some, help some draw conclusion's but to me it would not appeal to my personality or capability's and I would find it dry and empty, simply math, but someone else may see a great use of it, bring them closer to personally understanding Chasidism, all I am saying
His description or formula is not at all that different from Judaism, certainly not unique, Ein sof is described as nothing, cannot be conceived, so no it is not too esoteric
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Yesterday, 05:41 PM
Post: #104
RE: Bikes, Horse racing and Kabbalah
(05-20-2017 11:54 PM)Yefet Wrote:  Cantor used his mathematical skills and study as a way of explaining or justifying his religious beliefs, his way of understanding as much as one can, it was his Kabbalah, his enlightenment
Just as some Chazel used Gematria, some Sefirat, some the peshat, remez or drush, was speaking in general terms and not at all addressing his formula or method
It may interest some, help some draw conclusion's but to me it would not appeal to my personality or capability's and I would find it dry and empty, simply math, but someone else may see a great use of it, bring them closer to personally understanding Chasidism, all I am saying
His description or formula is not at all that different from Judaism, certainly not unique, Ein sof is described as nothing, cannot be conceived, so no it is not too esoteric

What you find dry and empty I find fascinating, even exhilarating. This was part of my 'enlightenment', although I hesitate to use so grandiose a word. Tongue To each his own, I guess.

We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them.
- Albert Einstein
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