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Can our children be jewish?
02-23-2010, 08:56 PM
Post: #1
Can our children be jewish?
My husband was born and raised Jewish but did not have a Bar Mitzvah. His grandmother was very religious following all of the laws but she passed away when my husband was young. When my father-in-law's mother passed he did not continue to observe all of the laws.

Myself I was born and raise Catholic. However in the same boat as my husband I never received the sacrament of Confirmation. My grandmother is religious and was the one who took us to church and enrolled us in religious classes.

Since then my husband and I were married. We had a non-traditional wedding... we lite a unity candle and broke a glass at the end of the ceremony.

We celebrate Christmas and Hanukkah with the appropriate families. We do not observe any other holidays in either religion. Occasionally we will participate in passover with my husbands father and eat dinner with my family on Easter.

My questions stems from all this confusion of religion in my and my husband's life. I feel like I am lacking something in my life in reguards to religion but do not feel strong ties to my own childhood religion. My husband feels the same.

We have talked about having children and what to know what is in store for them. We want them to have the option to chose either or neither religion. I was told by my husband's family that our children cannot be Jewish because I am not Jewish. What do we do?
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02-23-2010, 09:37 PM (This post was last modified: 02-23-2010 09:38 PM by Parousia.)
Post: #2
RE: Can our children be jewish?
My opinion: If you feel that you are missing something by not having a religion, go find one that you both like and think would be good for the children. The search alone will help solidify your thoughts. Personally I would keep away from either Judaism or Catholicism because it will raise expectations on one side of the family that you may not want to satisfy and run the risk of alienating the other side, no mattter what they say now. Find a suitable religion - or no religion - and do not tell anyone in either family about it. Otherwise continue as you have been with respect to your families.
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02-23-2010, 10:05 PM
Post: #3
RE: Can our children be jewish?
(02-23-2010 08:56 PM)lost-at-sea Wrote:  My husband was born and raised Jewish but did not have a Bar Mitzvah. His grandmother was very religious following all of the laws but she passed away when my husband was young. When my father-in-law's mother passed he did not continue to observe all of the laws.

Myself I was born and raise Catholic. However in the same boat as my husband I never received the sacrament of Confirmation. My grandmother is religious and was the one who took us to church and enrolled us in religious classes.

Since then my husband and I were married. We had a non-traditional wedding... we lite a unity candle and broke a glass at the end of the ceremony.

We celebrate Christmas and Hanukkah with the appropriate families. We do not observe any other holidays in either religion. Occasionally we will participate in passover with my husbands father and eat dinner with my family on Easter.

My questions stems from all this confusion of religion in my and my husband's life. I feel like I am lacking something in my life in reguards to religion but do not feel strong ties to my own childhood religion. My husband feels the same.

We have talked about having children and what to know what is in store for them. We want them to have the option to chose either or neither religion. I was told by my husband's family that our children cannot be Jewish because I am not Jewish. What do we do?

Your husband would need to make a return to Judaism and have a bar mitzvah, and you would have to convert to Judaism for your children to be accepted as Jews -- unless they are already born, in which case they would need to convert as well.

Unless you join a reform synagogue and your husband makes a return -- they accept children of interfaith marriages.

Pawol anpil pa leve le mo
Lavi m nan men Bondye o sen
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