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Christain Truth Out of Context
03-18-2017, 04:12 AM
Post: #41
RE: Christain Truth Out of Context
(03-17-2017 08:41 PM)Sue D. Wrote:  So -- What Christian truth is out of context? Sounds interesting.
Sue,
The thread starter is saying that it's things like Psalm 22. He is saying that Psalm 22 is not about the Messiah and that Christians are taking it out of context when they say that it is. Here is what he writes:

(03-30-2012 11:02 PM)chucknance Wrote:  Christians ... quote Old Testament scripture out of context.
they find meaning in obscure and unrelated text.

As an example, a favorite verse of Christians concerning the crucifixion is Psalm 22:16, "Dogs have surrounded me, they have pierced my hands and my feet." Psalm 22 is about God "forsaking me." In the text, there is no mention of the son of God or the Messiah, it is all about a "man" being forsaken by God.

We could continue verse after verse where Christians have appropriated Jewish verses out of context.
There are four basic reasons to see Psalm 22 as possibly Messianic:
1. David could be intentionally writing not about himself, but about Messiah
2. There are Messianic aspects to the chapter like when it says that the story of the person's redemption leads the world to praise God
3. David in the Tanakh is used as a metaphor of the Messiah
4. Jewish rabbinical tradition treats the Psalms sometimes as Messianic. Pesikta Rabbati, the Great Midrash, treats Psalm 22 in particular as Messianic.

The thread starter is objecting that it can't be about Messiah because he says he is forsaken by God. Christians have also thought of different ways to deal with the contradiction. One is the concept that Jesus is the "lamb of God" who bears the sins of the world. This concept can be found toward the beginning of John's gospel as well as in Isaiah 53 and the Yom Kippur ritual of Judaism, where a sheep or lamb that is without blemish is killed to carry the nation's sins. He is forsaken in the sense that God condemned him to suffering and death instead of the faithful who have sinned.
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03-18-2017, 04:15 AM
Post: #42
RE: Christain Truth Out of Context
Sue,

I advise you to go to this thread

Here you can find the answers to many questions, and meet banned people, dead people, and people that last were seen on this forum in 2010!

Don't cling to a mistake just because you spent a lot of time making it
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03-18-2017, 05:36 AM
Post: #43
RE: Christain Truth Out of Context
(03-18-2017 04:15 AM)Herminator Wrote:  Sue,

I advise you to go to this thread

Here you can find the answers to many questions, and meet banned people, dead people, and people that last were seen on this forum in 2010!

Big GrinWinkSmileRolleyes
Praise
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03-18-2017, 10:41 AM (This post was last modified: 03-18-2017 11:08 AM by Sue D..)
Post: #44
RE: Christain Truth Out of Context
(03-18-2017 04:12 AM)rako17 Wrote:  
(03-17-2017 08:41 PM)Sue D. Wrote:  So -- What Christian truth is out of context? Sounds interesting.
Sue,
The thread starter is saying that it's things like Psalm 22. He is saying that Psalm 22 is not about the Messiah and that Christians are taking it out of context when they say that it is. Here is what he writes:

(03-30-2012 11:02 PM)chucknance Wrote:  Christians ... quote Old Testament scripture out of context.
they find meaning in obscure and unrelated text.

As an example, a favorite verse of Christians concerning the crucifixion is Psalm 22:16, "Dogs have surrounded me, they have pierced my hands and my feet." Psalm 22 is about God "forsaking me." In the text, there is no mention of the son of God or the Messiah, it is all about a "man" being forsaken by God.

We could continue verse after verse where Christians have appropriated Jewish verses out of context.
There are four basic reasons to see Psalm 22 as possibly Messianic:
1. David could be intentionally writing not about himself, but about Messiah
2. There are Messianic aspects to the chapter like when it says that the story of the person's redemption leads the world to praise God
3. David in the Tanakh is used as a metaphor of the Messiah
4. Jewish rabbinical tradition treats the Psalms sometimes as Messianic. Pesikta Rabbati, the Great Midrash, treats Psalm 22 in particular as Messianic.

The thread starter is objecting that it can't be about Messiah because he says he is forsaken by God. Christians have also thought of different ways to deal with the contradiction. One is the concept that Jesus is the "lamb of God" who bears the sins of the world. This concept can be found toward the beginning of John's gospel as well as in Isaiah 53 and the Yom Kippur ritual of Judaism, where a sheep or lamb that is without blemish is killed to carry the nation's sins. He is forsaken in the sense that God condemned him to suffering and death instead of the faithful who have sinned.

I'm seeing that Psalm as a combo of David and Messianic vs 16 - 18 -- my NKJ has a cross reference to Matthew 27:35. I don't see anything 'out of context' -- it's a Psalm. Maybe someone doesn't like what the Psalm is Saying, but that's not because anything is out of context. Just my thoughts on the subject.


(03-18-2017 10:41 AM)Sue D. Wrote:  
(03-18-2017 04:12 AM)rako17 Wrote:  
(03-17-2017 08:41 PM)Sue D. Wrote:  So -- What Christian truth is out of context? Sounds interesting.
Sue,
The thread starter is saying that it's things like Psalm 22. He is saying that Psalm 22 is not about the Messiah and that Christians are taking it out of context when they say that it is. Here is what he writes:

(03-30-2012 11:02 PM)chucknance Wrote:  Christians ... quote Old Testament scripture out of context.
they find meaning in obscure and unrelated text.

As an example, a favorite verse of Christians concerning the crucifixion is Psalm 22:16, "Dogs have surrounded me, they have pierced my hands and my feet." Psalm 22 is about God "forsaking me." In the text, there is no mention of the son of God or the Messiah, it is all about a "man" being forsaken by God.

We could continue verse after verse where Christians have appropriated Jewish verses out of context.
There are four basic reasons to see Psalm 22 as possibly Messianic:
1. David could be intentionally writing not about himself, but about Messiah
2. There are Messianic aspects to the chapter like when it says that the story of the person's redemption leads the world to praise God
3. David in the Tanakh is used as a metaphor of the Messiah
4. Jewish rabbinical tradition treats the Psalms sometimes as Messianic. Pesikta Rabbati, the Great Midrash, treats Psalm 22 in particular as Messianic.

The thread starter is objecting that it can't be about Messiah because he says he is forsaken by God. Christians have also thought of different ways to deal with the contradiction. One is the concept that Jesus is the "lamb of God" who bears the sins of the world. This concept can be found toward the beginning of John's gospel as well as in Isaiah 53 and the Yom Kippur ritual of Judaism, where a sheep or lamb that is without blemish is killed to carry the nation's sins. He is forsaken in the sense that God condemned him to suffering and death instead of the faithful who have sinned.

I'm seeing that Psalm as a combo of David and Messianic vs 16 - 18 -- my NKJ has a cross reference to Matthew 27:35. I don't see anything 'out of context' -- it's a Psalm. Maybe someone doesn't like what the Psalm is Saying, but that's not because anything is out of context. Just my thoughts on the subject.


I also agree with Your last 3 sentences "One is the concept that....."


(03-18-2017 10:41 AM)Sue D. Wrote:  
(03-18-2017 04:12 AM)rako17 Wrote:  
(03-17-2017 08:41 PM)Sue D. Wrote:  So -- What Christian truth is out of context? Sounds interesting.
Sue,
The thread starter is saying that it's things like Psalm 22. He is saying that Psalm 22 is not about the Messiah and that Christians are taking it out of context when they say that it is. Here is what he writes:

(03-30-2012 11:02 PM)chucknance Wrote:  Christians ... quote Old Testament scripture out of context.
they find meaning in obscure and unrelated text.

As an example, a favorite verse of Christians concerning the crucifixion is Psalm 22:16, "Dogs have surrounded me, they have pierced my hands and my feet." Psalm 22 is about God "forsaking me." In the text, there is no mention of the son of God or the Messiah, it is all about a "man" being forsaken by God.

We could continue verse after verse where Christians have appropriated Jewish verses out of context.
There are four basic reasons to see Psalm 22 as possibly Messianic:
1. David could be intentionally writing not about himself, but about Messiah
2. There are Messianic aspects to the chapter like when it says that the story of the person's redemption leads the world to praise God
3. David in the Tanakh is used as a metaphor of the Messiah
4. Jewish rabbinical tradition treats the Psalms sometimes as Messianic. Pesikta Rabbati, the Great Midrash, treats Psalm 22 in particular as Messianic.

The thread starter is objecting that it can't be about Messiah because he says he is forsaken by God. Christians have also thought of different ways to deal with the contradiction. One is the concept that Jesus is the "lamb of God" who bears the sins of the world. This concept can be found toward the beginning of John's gospel as well as in Isaiah 53 and the Yom Kippur ritual of Judaism, where a sheep or lamb that is without blemish is killed to carry the nation's sins. He is forsaken in the sense that God condemned him to suffering and death instead of the faithful who have sinned.

I'm seeing that Psalm as a combo of David and Messianic vs 16 - 18 -- my NKJ has a cross reference to Matthew 27:35. I don't see anything 'out of context' -- it's a Psalm. Maybe someone doesn't like what the Psalm is Saying, but that's not because anything is out of context. Just my thoughts on the subject.


I also agree with Your last 3 sentences "One is the concept that....."


(03-18-2017 10:41 AM)Sue D. Wrote:  
(03-18-2017 04:12 AM)rako17 Wrote:  
(03-17-2017 08:41 PM)Sue D. Wrote:  So -- What Christian truth is out of context? Sounds interesting.
Sue,
The thread starter is saying that it's things like Psalm 22. He is saying that Psalm 22 is not about the Messiah and that Christians are taking it out of context when they say that it is. Here is what he writes:

(03-30-2012 11:02 PM)chucknance Wrote:  Christians ... quote Old Testament scripture out of context.
they find meaning in obscure and unrelated text.

As an example, a favorite verse of Christians concerning the crucifixion is Psalm 22:16, "Dogs have surrounded me, they have pierced my hands and my feet." Psalm 22 is about God "forsaking me." In the text, there is no mention of the son of God or the Messiah, it is all about a "man" being forsaken by God.

We could continue verse after verse where Christians have appropriated Jewish verses out of context.
There are four basic reasons to see Psalm 22 as possibly Messianic:
1. David could be intentionally writing not about himself, but about Messiah
2. There are Messianic aspects to the chapter like when it says that the story of the person's redemption leads the world to praise God
3. David in the Tanakh is used as a metaphor of the Messiah
4. Jewish rabbinical tradition treats the Psalms sometimes as Messianic. Pesikta Rabbati, the Great Midrash, treats Psalm 22 in particular as Messianic.

The thread starter is objecting that it can't be about Messiah because he says he is forsaken by God. Christians have also thought of different ways to deal with the contradiction. One is the concept that Jesus is the "lamb of God" who bears the sins of the world. This concept can be found toward the beginning of John's gospel as well as in Isaiah 53 and the Yom Kippur ritual of Judaism, where a sheep or lamb that is without blemish is killed to carry the nation's sins. He is forsaken in the sense that God condemned him to suffering and death instead of the faithful who have sinned.

I'm seeing that Psalm as a combo of David and Messianic vs 16 - 18 -- my NKJ has a cross reference to Matthew 27:35. I don't see anything 'out of context' -- it's a Psalm. Maybe someone doesn't like what the Psalm is Saying, but that's not because anything is out of context. Just my thoughts on the subject.


I also agree with Your last 3 sentences "One is the concept that.....".


Sorry about those post repeats -- my computer was having a problem.
(03-18-2017 04:15 AM)Herminator Wrote:  Sue,

I advise you to go to this thread

Here you can find the answers to many questions, and meet banned people, dead people, and people that last were seen on this forum in 2010!

Didn't know that you had the power To resurrect banned people. But then again , you apparently resurrected Me from 1 1/2 years ago.

And, I've already met the guy from 2010 that you resurrected.

There's a discussion about Daniel 9 going on 'here'. And, why, pray tell did you think I'd want to go There?!


(03-18-2017 10:41 AM)Sue D. Wrote:  
(03-18-2017 04:12 AM)rako17 Wrote:  
(03-17-2017 08:41 PM)Sue D. Wrote:  So -- What Christian truth is out of context? Sounds interesting.
Sue,
The thread starter is saying that it's things like Psalm 22. He is saying that Psalm 22 is not about the Messiah and that Christians are taking it out of context when they say that it is. Here is what he writes:

(03-30-2012 11:02 PM)chucknance Wrote:  Christians ... quote Old Testament scripture out of context.
they find meaning in obscure and unrelated text.

As an example, a favorite verse of Christians concerning the crucifixion is Psalm 22:16, "Dogs have surrounded me, they have pierced my hands and my feet." Psalm 22 is about God "forsaking me." In the text, there is no mention of the son of God or the Messiah, it is all about a "man" being forsaken by God.

We could continue verse after verse where Christians have appropriated Jewish verses out of context.
There are four basic reasons to see Psalm 22 as possibly Messianic:
1. David could be intentionally writing not about himself, but about Messiah
2. There are Messianic aspects to the chapter like when it says that the story of the person's redemption leads the world to praise God
3. David in the Tanakh is used as a metaphor of the Messiah
4. Jewish rabbinical tradition treats the Psalms sometimes as Messianic. Pesikta Rabbati, the Great Midrash, treats Psalm 22 in particular as Messianic.

The thread starter is objecting that it can't be about Messiah because he says he is forsaken by God. Christians have also thought of different ways to deal with the contradiction. One is the concept that Jesus is the "lamb of God" who bears the sins of the world. This concept can be found toward the beginning of John's gospel as well as in Isaiah 53 and the Yom Kippur ritual of Judaism, where a sheep or lamb that is without blemish is killed to carry the nation's sins. He is forsaken in the sense that God condemned him to suffering and death instead of the faithful who have sinned.

I'm seeing that Psalm as a combo of David and Messianic vs 16 - 18 -- my NKJ has a cross reference to Matthew 27:35. I don't see anything 'out of context' -- it's a Psalm. Maybe someone doesn't like what the Psalm is Saying, but that's not because anything is out of context. Just my thoughts on the subject.


(03-18-2017 10:41 AM)Sue D. Wrote:  
(03-18-2017 04:12 AM)rako17 Wrote:  
(03-17-2017 08:41 PM)Sue D. Wrote:  So -- What Christian truth is out of context? Sounds interesting.
Sue,
The thread starter is saying that it's things like Psalm 22. He is saying that Psalm 22 is not about the Messiah and that Christians are taking it out of context when they say that it is. Here is what he writes:

(03-30-2012 11:02 PM)chucknance Wrote:  Christians ... quote Old Testament scripture out of context.
they find meaning in obscure and unrelated text.

As an example, a favorite verse of Christians concerning the crucifixion is Psalm 22:16, "Dogs have surrounded me, they have pierced my hands and my feet." Psalm 22 is about God "forsaking me." In the text, there is no mention of the son of God or the Messiah, it is all about a "man" being forsaken by God.

We could continue verse after verse where Christians have appropriated Jewish verses out of context.
There are four basic reasons to see Psalm 22 as possibly Messianic:
1. David could be intentionally writing not about himself, but about Messiah
2. There are Messianic aspects to the chapter like when it says that the story of the person's redemption leads the world to praise God
3. David in the Tanakh is used as a metaphor of the Messiah
4. Jewish rabbinical tradition treats the Psalms sometimes as Messianic. Pesikta Rabbati, the Great Midrash, treats Psalm 22 in particular as Messianic.

The thread starter is objecting that it can't be about Messiah because he says he is forsaken by God. Christians have also thought of different ways to deal with the contradiction. One is the concept that Jesus is the "lamb of God" who bears the sins of the world. This concept can be found toward the beginning of John's gospel as well as in Isaiah 53 and the Yom Kippur ritual of Judaism, where a sheep or lamb that is without blemish is killed to carry the nation's sins. He is forsaken in the sense that God condemned him to suffering and death instead of the faithful who have sinned.

I'm seeing that Psalm as a combo of David and Messianic vs 16 - 18 -- my NKJ has a cross reference to Matthew 27:35. I don't see anything 'out of context' -- it's a Psalm. Maybe someone doesn't like what the Psalm is Saying, but that's not because anything is out of context. Just my thoughts on the subject.


I also agree with Your last 3 sentences "One is the concept that....."


(03-18-2017 10:41 AM)Sue D. Wrote:  
(03-18-2017 04:12 AM)rako17 Wrote:  
(03-17-2017 08:41 PM)Sue D. Wrote:  So -- What Christian truth is out of context? Sounds interesting.
Sue,
The thread starter is saying that it's things like Psalm 22. He is saying that Psalm 22 is not about the Messiah and that Christians are taking it out of context when they say that it is. Here is what he writes:

(03-30-2012 11:02 PM)chucknance Wrote:  Christians ... quote Old Testament scripture out of context.
they find meaning in obscure and unrelated text.

As an example, a favorite verse of Christians concerning the crucifixion is Psalm 22:16, "Dogs have surrounded me, they have pierced my hands and my feet." Psalm 22 is about God "forsaking me." In the text, there is no mention of the son of God or the Messiah, it is all about a "man" being forsaken by God.

We could continue verse after verse where Christians have appropriated Jewish verses out of context.
There are four basic reasons to see Psalm 22 as possibly Messianic:
1. David could be intentionally writing not about himself, but about Messiah
2. There are Messianic aspects to the chapter like when it says that the story of the person's redemption leads the world to praise God
3. David in the Tanakh is used as a metaphor of the Messiah
4. Jewish rabbinical tradition treats the Psalms sometimes as Messianic. Pesikta Rabbati, the Great Midrash, treats Psalm 22 in particular as Messianic.

The thread starter is objecting that it can't be about Messiah because he says he is forsaken by God. Christians have also thought of different ways to deal with the contradiction. One is the concept that Jesus is the "lamb of God" who bears the sins of the world. This concept can be found toward the beginning of John's gospel as well as in Isaiah 53 and the Yom Kippur ritual of Judaism, where a sheep or lamb that is without blemish is killed to carry the nation's sins. He is forsaken in the sense that God condemned him to suffering and death instead of the faithful who have sinned.

I'm seeing that Psalm as a combo of David and Messianic vs 16 - 18 -- my NKJ has a cross reference to Matthew 27:35. I don't see anything 'out of context' -- it's a Psalm. Maybe someone doesn't like what the Psalm is Saying, but that's not because anything is out of context. Just my thoughts on the subject.


I also agree with Your last 3 sentences "One is the concept that....."


(03-18-2017 10:41 AM)Sue D. Wrote:  
(03-18-2017 04:12 AM)rako17 Wrote:  
(03-17-2017 08:41 PM)Sue D. Wrote:  So -- What Christian truth is out of context? Sounds interesting.
Sue,
The thread starter is saying that it's things like Psalm 22. He is saying that Psalm 22 is not about the Messiah and that Christians are taking it out of context when they say that it is. Here is what he writes:

(03-30-2012 11:02 PM)chucknance Wrote:  Christians ... quote Old Testament scripture out of context.
they find meaning in obscure and unrelated text.

As an example, a favorite verse of Christians concerning the crucifixion is Psalm 22:16, "Dogs have surrounded me, they have pierced my hands and my feet." Psalm 22 is about God "forsaking me." In the text, there is no mention of the son of God or the Messiah, it is all about a "man" being forsaken by God.

We could continue verse after verse where Christians have appropriated Jewish verses out of context.
There are four basic reasons to see Psalm 22 as possibly Messianic:
1. David could be intentionally writing not about himself, but about Messiah
2. There are Messianic aspects to the chapter like when it says that the story of the person's redemption leads the world to praise God
3. David in the Tanakh is used as a metaphor of the Messiah
4. Jewish rabbinical tradition treats the Psalms sometimes as Messianic. Pesikta Rabbati, the Great Midrash, treats Psalm 22 in particular as Messianic.

The thread starter is objecting that it can't be about Messiah because he says he is forsaken by God. Christians have also thought of different ways to deal with the contradiction. One is the concept that Jesus is the "lamb of God" who bears the sins of the world. This concept can be found toward the beginning of John's gospel as well as in Isaiah 53 and the Yom Kippur ritual of Judaism, where a sheep or lamb that is without blemish is killed to carry the nation's sins. He is forsaken in the sense that God condemned him to suffering and death instead of the faithful who have sinned.

I'm seeing that Psalm as a combo of David and Messianic vs 16 - 18 -- my NKJ has a cross reference to Matthew 27:35. I don't see anything 'out of context' -- it's a Psalm. Maybe someone doesn't like what the Psalm is Saying, but that's not because anything is out of context. Just my thoughts on the subject.


I also agree with Your last 3 sentences "One is the concept that.....".


Sorry about those post repeats -- my computer was having a problem.
(03-18-2017 04:15 AM)Herminator Wrote:  Sue,

I advise you to go to this thread

Here you can find the answers to many questions, and meet banned people, dead people, and people that last were seen on this forum in 2010!

Didn't know that you had the power To resurrect banned people. But then again , you apparently resurrected Me from 1 1/2 years ago.

And, I've already met the guy from 2010 that you resurrected.

There's a discussion about Daniel 9 going on 'here'. And, why, pray tell did you think I'd want to go There?!

Messed up -- it was 'this thread' Not 'here' that I was to click into.


(03-18-2017 03:15 AM)Herminator Wrote:  
(03-17-2017 08:41 PM)Sue D. Wrote:  So -- What Christian truth is out of context? Sounds interesting.

We'll leave you to figure it out for yourself Wink


Herm -- I suspect that you'd find Any Christian truth to be "out of context" or not to be taken seriously. Because - as you've commented -- Words are but words, Sue, words are but words --- cause it's all hearsay.

And I'm not getting into Daniel 9 with anyone. Big Grin
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03-18-2017, 12:33 PM
Post: #45
RE: Christain Truth Out of Context
(03-18-2017 10:41 AM)Sue D. Wrote:  you apparently resurrected Me from 1 1/2 years ago.

And, I've already met the guy from 2010 that you resurrected.

There's a discussion about Daniel 9 going on 'here'. And, why, pray tell did you think I'd want to go There?!
Hello, Sue.

We can talk about Daniel 9 here if you want, but it would be more convenient for me in the thread I started about it.

I think Daniel 9's basic calculation is worth understanding, because it says to "know and understand" that after 483 years from the Word saying To Rebuild Jerusalem, an Anointed One would be Cut off and be no more. The angel's message is telling Daniel to know and understand this.

Since Jerusalem was destroyed in the 6th c. BC and rebuilt in the 5th c. BC, the Word to rebuild it would have to come somewhere between those times, that is, after the destruction and before the rebuilding. The Bible has several candidates for such Words, the clearest being in the mid 5th c. BC. So that points to a date of the 1st c. BC-AD for the Anointed one.
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03-18-2017, 02:32 PM
Post: #46
RE: Christain Truth Out of Context
(03-18-2017 10:41 AM)Sue D. Wrote:  
Herminator Wrote:
(03-18-2017 10:41 AM)Sue D. Wrote:  So -- What Christian truth is out of context? Sounds interesting.

We'll leave you to figure it out for yourself Wink


Herm -- I suspect that you'd find Any Christian truth to be "out of context" or not to be taken seriously. Because - as you've commented -- Words are but words, Sue, words are but words --- cause it's all hearsay.

And I'm not getting into Daniel 9 with anyone. Big Grin

"The Christian truth out of context" was obviously referring to the OP of this thread - which is what might be of interest to you.

Good plan not to get involved with Rako and his Daniel 9 thread - he's just trolling.

Don't cling to a mistake just because you spent a lot of time making it
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03-18-2017, 05:01 PM
Post: #47
RE: Christain Truth Out of Context
(03-18-2017 12:33 PM)rako17 Wrote:  
(03-18-2017 10:41 AM)Sue D. Wrote:  you apparently resurrected Me from 1 1/2 years ago.

And, I've already met the guy from 2010 that you resurrected.

There's a discussion about Daniel 9 going on 'here'. And, why, pray tell did you think I'd want to go There?!
Hello, Sue.

We can talk about Daniel 9 here if you want, but it would be more convenient for me in the thread I started about it.

I think Daniel 9's basic calculation is worth understanding, because it says to "know and understand" that after 483 years from the Word saying To Rebuild Jerusalem, an Anointed One would be Cut off and be no more. The angel's message is telling Daniel to know and understand this.

Since Jerusalem was destroyed in the 6th c. BC and rebuilt in the 5th c. BC, the Word to rebuild it would have to come somewhere between those times, that is, after the destruction and before the rebuilding. The Bible has several candidates for such Words, the clearest being in the mid 5th c. BC. So that points to a date of the 1st c. BC-AD for the Anointed one.


The Book of Daniel is very complicated -- especially the part you're talking about. This is Not the thread to discuss it in. And I Do have my beliefs about all of that, but not enough to discuss it with anyone who has differing beliefs about it. I have a surface understanding. I'm thinking that Susanblange is there, too.
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03-20-2017, 02:08 PM
Post: #48
RE: Christain Truth Out of Context
So - what Other Christian Truth is out of context?! Or is there a difference between Christian truths from the Bible and Christian Truth compared to Jewish Truth ?
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03-20-2017, 02:15 PM
Post: #49
RE: Christain Truth Out of Context
(03-20-2017 02:08 PM)Sue D. Wrote:  So - what Other Christian Truth is out of context?!

Last time I'll repeat it: it's in the OP of the thread we are in now.

Warning: the poster left the forum three years ago, although that wouldn't stop Rako from inviting him to discuss Daniel 9 with him in his "home thread".

You Sue might however be more interested to read the 5 pages of replies to the OP... to give you some perspective.

Don't cling to a mistake just because you spent a lot of time making it
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03-20-2017, 09:38 PM
Post: #50
RE: Christain Truth Out of Context
(03-20-2017 02:15 PM)Herminator Wrote:  
(03-20-2017 02:08 PM)Sue D. Wrote:  So - what Other Christian Truth is out of context?!

Last time I'll repeat it: it's in the OP of the thread we are in now.

Warning: the poster left the forum three years ago, although that wouldn't stop Rako from inviting him to discuss Daniel 9 with him in his "home thread".

You Sue might however be more interested to read the 5 pages of replies to the OP... to give you some perspective.

Obviously I've misunderstood the title / objective of this particular thread. Sorry.
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