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Do you eat meat?
09-30-2016, 06:54 AM
Post: #91
RE: Do you eat meat?
(09-29-2016 09:35 PM)Caesar Saladin Wrote:  I have friends who eat meat and friends who do not eat meat.

A subset of those would be friends whom I would eat, regardless of their diet.

A subset of the last would include those friends whom I have eaten in the past or may eat in the future, but I suspect that's a different activity than the one being discussed.

It's all about the love between friends Big Grin

http://www.religionforums.org/Thread-Imp...#pid272893

And here I sit so patiently waiting to find out what price
You have to pay to get out of going through all these things twice
Dylan
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09-30-2016, 01:58 PM
Post: #92
RE: Do you eat meat?
(09-30-2016 06:54 AM)Imprecise Interrupt Wrote:  http://www.religionforums.org/Thread-Imp...#pid272893

LOLOLOL !!!

When someone asks "What would Jesus do?" remind them that flipping tables and chasing people with a whip is entirely possible.
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01-28-2017, 02:55 PM
Post: #93
RE: Do you eat meat?
(12-13-2013 09:06 AM)Spiny Norman Wrote:  Do you eat meat, and if so, do you have any concerns about it from the point of view of Buddhist ethics, including the principles of non-harm and loving kindness?

I do think about the animal and if suffering was significant or not. I also reflect on nature. Who we are as well as the wild animals where instinct holds presidence over sapience and empathy. Predator and prey relationships concerning all living beings and the roles it plays in nature.

I do eat meat. I had slaughtered animals in the past when I used to hunt and farm as well as spared their lives as the occasion arises.

It reminds me of the story told of the scorpion being carried across the river, and it's nature of being a scorpion.

I think it's something that needs to be accepted for what it is.

I wouldn't condemn any living being that kills and eats living prey no more than one who tills soil underfoot and pulls up vegetables for consumption.

Compassion and consideration should play a role and be encouraged no matter what one's disposition is on the subject.

I imagine what the extremes are of killing too much and too brutally compared to that of not killing at all and the consequences across the spectrum such would entail.

I would choose natural balances and equilibrium in the manner and considerations involving killing and consumption
for which compassion plays a universal role.
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02-13-2017, 03:34 AM (This post was last modified: 02-13-2017 03:39 AM by ajay0.)
Post: #94
RE: Do you eat meat?
I am a vegetarian at present though I was a non-vegetarian earlier.

I enjoyed meat dishes but I did not exactly enjoy the screams and panic-stricken movements of birds when they were cut at the throat, whenever I used to visit the butcher.

And the sight of the terror filled birds and animals being brought to the butcher shop, and put in cages to be killed was also not very aesthetic, pleasant and soothing.

Philosophising on this issue, I came to the conclusion that enjoying the meat of birds and animals after killing them, when they enjoyed life and living themselves, is not very moral and ethical so to speak. In fact it seemed more like the rape of innocent sentient beings for the sake of sense-pleasure , disregarding their own objections.

The influence of Mahatma Gandhi, Buddha, Mahavira and Leonardo da Vinci also helped in my decision to become a vegetarian later on.

A saying of an ancient saint Tiruvalluvar gave me a lot of peace of mind in this regard as well and strengthened my conviction...

All creatures will join their hands together,
and worship him who has never taken away life, nor eaten flesh.


The meat industry similarly is said to contribute significantly to global warming, and that can be cited also as a further reason to strengthen my conviction to be a vegetarian and contribute my bit to saving the world or at least mitigating the damage caused.

Self-awareness is yoga. - Nisargadatta Maharaj

Mindfulness is the true virtue. - Buddha

Evil is an extreme manifestation of human unconsciousness. - Eckhart Tolle
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02-18-2017, 06:42 PM
Post: #95
RE: Do you eat meat?
(02-13-2017 03:34 AM)ajay0 Wrote:  contribute my bit to saving the world or at least mitigating the damage caused.
Good on you.

..
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06-06-2017, 04:50 PM
Post: #96
RE: Do you eat meat?
(12-13-2013 09:06 AM)Spiny Norman Wrote:  Do you eat meat, and if so, do you have any concerns about it from the point of view of Buddhist ethics, including the principles of non-harm and loving kindness?

This is probably the dumbest subject for a Buddhist forum, ever.

It's dumb because it always takes the same track, and nobody's mind is changed.

When Norman was a mod on another Buddhist board some years ago, he started a thread that lasted for years, leterally, and the discussion never changed - just round and round and round.

Even the the erroneous use of "straw man".

I once suggested that a universal rule be instiuted that no Buddhist forum would accept discussion of vegetarian vs meat diet.
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06-06-2017, 04:56 PM (This post was last modified: 06-06-2017 04:58 PM by jamesduncan.)
Post: #97
RE: Do you eat meat?
Yes I eat meat; having said that I believe we will not be visited by star travelers until we no longer eat the flesh of other animals, fish or mammals including birds
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06-09-2017, 10:42 AM (This post was last modified: 06-09-2017 10:51 AM by IMtM.)
Post: #98
RE: Do you eat meat?
(06-06-2017 04:50 PM)IdleChater Wrote:  
(12-13-2013 09:06 AM)Spiny Norman Wrote:  Do you eat meat, and if so, do you have any concerns about it from the point of view of Buddhist ethics, including the principles of non-harm and loving kindness?

This is probably the dumbest subject for a Buddhist forum, ever.

It's dumb because it always takes the same track, and nobody's mind is changed.

When Norman was a mod on another Buddhist board some years ago, he started a thread that lasted for years, leterally, and the discussion never changed - just round and round and round.

Even the the erroneous use of "straw man".

I once suggested that a universal rule be instiuted that no Buddhist forum would accept discussion of vegetarian vs meat diet.
I'm not going to say whether or not I agree with you but: hahahaha. Big Grin Debate is mongering is attachment... Belief is mongering is attachment... Your own beliefs are mongering is attachment...

..
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10-12-2017, 12:27 PM (This post was last modified: 10-12-2017 12:30 PM by Amememhab.)
Post: #99
RE: Do you eat meat?
Green plants are organisms which possess individual identities and reproduce sexually, as animals do. Why is it okay to kill and eat them, but not animals—down to the tiniest aphids on the stems? I’m hardly the only one acknowledging this fact and tendering this counter-query here during the years since the OP asked the carnivory question. Why, I saw someone worried about his sneezes ejecting symbiotic bacteria unable to live outside the epithelium of a human respiratory tract—ahh, the warm, luscious mucus of it all!

Nonetheless, I’d like to quit meat, and just go with milk or yoghurt. I got sick on ground beef patties I’d gotten from Catholic Community Services’ pantry. The stuff was so gamey it ruined two days of my life—I barely kept from chucking up amid a torrent of diarrhea, casting some of my intestinal flora to death in the porcelain alongside the cells I’d sneezed onto the toilet paper.

The doctrine of ahimsa (no harm to living beings) taken literally is a no-go for us, unless we’re gonna bud out a crop of leaves and start photosynthesizing in the sun. Even plants doom one another, by shading shorter colleagues or emitting toxins from their roots. I suspect the answer is that at the time Hinduism made a virtue of necessity, plants were thought of as part of the soil, the earth, not alive as animals are. Makes sense, when you consider that few plants move on their own. So, I wallow in the joys of heterotrophy with science books enlightening me on the true nature of plants.
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