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God Barbie
12-19-2009, 10:40 PM (This post was last modified: 12-19-2009 10:42 PM by Aingeal.)
Post: #1
God Barbie
I'm putting this here, because it's definitely an "etc".

I can't decide whether to be amused, interested or what. I'm not easily offended, which is why that's not on the list, but...I came across this and sort of facepalmed.

Mattel took the goddess Aine and made Her into a barbie doll. I guess you could consider it a statue or something, but I'm still trying to figure out WHY. Is Barbie going religious now? And why this fairly minor -usually-no-one-knows-who-the-hell-I'm-talking-about-goddess?

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12-20-2009, 07:51 AM
Post: #2
RE: God Barbie
(12-19-2009 10:40 PM)Aingeal Wrote:  Mattel took the goddess Aine and made Her into a barbie doll. I guess you could consider it a statue or something, but I'm still trying to figure out WHY. Is Barbie going religious now? And why this fairly minor -usually-no-one-knows-who-the-hell-I'm-talking-about-goddess?

Next thing they will start having secular holidays featuring obscure Christian saints!
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12-20-2009, 09:14 AM (This post was last modified: 12-20-2009 10:04 AM by clarence clutterbuck.)
Post: #3
RE: God Barbie
According to Wikipedia, Aine is an Irish Goddess who is "associated with the sun and midsummer, and is sometimes represented by a red mare."

Her private life sounds a bit too racy to form the basis of the typical play that girls engage in with dollies:

Quote:In early tales she is associated with the semi-mythological King of Munster, Ailill Aulom, who is said to have "ravished" her, an affair ending in Áine biting off his ear - hence "Aulom", meaning "one-eared". By maiming him this way, Áine rendered him unfit to be King, thereby taking away the power of sovereignty.The descendants of Aulom, the Eóganachta, claim Áine as an ancestor.

In other tales Áine is the wife of Gearoid Iarla. Rather than having a consensual marriage, he rapes her (thought to be based on the story of Ailill Aulom), and she exacts her revenge by either changing him into a goose, killing him, or both. Due to this the Geraldines also claim an important association with Áine.

With her rapes, ravishings, maimings and murders, Aine doesn't seem like the ideal role model to be embodied in a child's dolly, although I suppose she is more visually appealing than "Trailer Trash Barbie".

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12-20-2009, 04:21 PM
Post: #4
RE: God Barbie
(12-20-2009 09:14 AM)clarence clutterbuck Wrote:  According to Wikipedia, Aine is an Irish Goddess who is "associated with the sun and midsummer, and is sometimes represented by a red mare."

Her private life sounds a bit too racy to form the basis of the typical play that girls engage in with dollies:

Quote:In early tales she is associated with the semi-mythological King of Munster, Ailill Aulom, who is said to have "ravished" her, an affair ending in Áine biting off his ear - hence "Aulom", meaning "one-eared". By maiming him this way, Áine rendered him unfit to be King, thereby taking away the power of sovereignty.The descendants of Aulom, the Eóganachta, claim Áine as an ancestor.

In other tales Áine is the wife of Gearoid Iarla. Rather than having a consensual marriage, he rapes her (thought to be based on the story of Ailill Aulom), and she exacts her revenge by either changing him into a goose, killing him, or both. Due to this the Geraldines also claim an important association with Áine.

With her rapes, ravishings, maimings and murders, Aine doesn't seem like the ideal role model to be embodied in a child's dolly, although I suppose she is more visually appealing than "Trailer Trash Barbie".

Wikipedia doesn't have a very good page on her, but yes. She is a goddess of war, fertility, and love. Sort of like a combination of Bellona and Venus.

It's just...sort of mind-boggling to make her a Barbie of all things.
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12-20-2009, 08:27 PM (This post was last modified: 12-20-2009 08:57 PM by Parousia.)
Post: #5
RE: God Barbie
(12-20-2009 04:21 PM)Aingeal Wrote:  Wikipedia doesn't have a very good page on her, but yes. She is a goddess of war, fertility, and love. Sort of like a combination of Bellona and Venus.

Here is a better page, I think.

http://www.uark.edu/studorg/stpa/aine.html


BTW, sidhe is pronounced 'shee'. Guess how bean-sidhe is pronounced....
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12-21-2009, 09:42 AM
Post: #6
RE: God Barbie
(12-20-2009 08:27 PM)Parousia Wrote:  
(12-20-2009 04:21 PM)Aingeal Wrote:  Wikipedia doesn't have a very good page on her, but yes. She is a goddess of war, fertility, and love. Sort of like a combination of Bellona and Venus.

Here is a better page, I think.

http://www.uark.edu/studorg/stpa/aine.html


BTW, sidhe is pronounced 'shee'. Guess how bean-sidhe is pronounced....

That page is better, a little Wiccan in their explanations I think, with the talk of the Mother, Maiden and Crone, but better than Wikipedia.

Bean sidhe really just means fairy woman, and it is pronounced " ban shee" en Gaelic a i next to an s creates a "sh" sound, and the dh in the word become aspirated, and the "e" in bean is left silent.
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12-21-2009, 10:21 AM
Post: #7
RE: God Barbie
(12-21-2009 09:42 AM)Aingeal Wrote:  Bean sidhe really just means fairy woman, and it is pronounced " ban shee" en Gaelic a i next to an s creates a "sh" sound, and the dh in the word become aspirated, and the "e" in bean is left silent.

Smile

The prounuciation comment was of course really meant for the audience at large, not you in particular.
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12-21-2009, 12:36 PM
Post: #8
RE: God Barbie
(12-21-2009 10:21 AM)Parousia Wrote:  
(12-21-2009 09:42 AM)Aingeal Wrote:  Bean sidhe really just means fairy woman, and it is pronounced " ban shee" en Gaelic a i next to an s creates a "sh" sound, and the dh in the word become aspirated, and the "e" in bean is left silent.

Smile

The prounuciation comment was of course really meant for the audience at large, not you in particular.

I know! I wasn't offended, I was just explaining why....mostly because it's my first language and people tend to go "how does sidhe turn into shee" and "that says BEAN".
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12-21-2009, 12:45 PM
Post: #9
RE: God Barbie
(12-21-2009 12:36 PM)Aingeal Wrote:  I know! I wasn't offended, I was just explaining why....mostly because it's my first language and people tend to go "how does sidhe turn into shee" and "that says BEAN".

My new neighbors can speak some Irish, and speak English with an accent. Sadly, my family has not spoken 'in the Irish' for about 160 years.
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12-21-2009, 09:50 PM
Post: #10
RE: God Barbie
It's like my cat. You spell my cat's name "Geamhradh". You pronounce it "Garah" (like Sarah, but with a slightly rolled r.) It means "winter". Celtic languages have lots of silly consonants that don't matter, except to tell you how to pronounce the vowels.

Really, I want to shoot whoever decided the standard for transliterating the Celtic languages.

I'm back baby! Thanks for everyone who sent me PMs asking what had happened to me.
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