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Polytheists and Neo-Paganists
12-19-2009, 02:45 PM
Post: #1
Polytheists and Neo-Paganists
What made you pick your specific belief, I mean there are just so many different polytheistic religions out there, one for each culture pretty much. What are your basic tenets, who are your gods, how many are there, etc?
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12-19-2009, 03:04 PM
Post: #2
RE: Polytheists and Neo-Paganists
(12-19-2009 02:45 PM)Holy Babylon Wrote:  What made you pick your specific belief, I mean there are just so many different polytheistic religions out there, one for each culture pretty much. What are your basic tenets, who are your gods, how many are there, etc?

What made me pick my specific belief?

Personal experience with a particular deity. I'm a Celtic Polytheist

Basic tenets? I'm not sure I follow what you mean.
I have a belief that there are multiple gods
I believe there was no "creation."
I believe that there are multiple dimensions, in concordance with our myths.
I believe in honour, honesty, hospitality. Everything else falls under those beliefs.

The thing about "how many gods are there" is a bit...shifty. The thing about Celtic Polytheism, and polytheism in general is that we don't say that our gods are the only gods. We just don't care about those deities that don't effect us, or take interests in our lives.

I personally, worship only three: Aine, Dagda, and the Morrigan trinity. (Macha, Nemain, and Bedb).
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12-19-2009, 05:10 PM (This post was last modified: 12-19-2009 11:54 PM by Venedi Sporoi.)
Post: #3
RE: Polytheists and Neo-Paganists
(12-19-2009 02:45 PM)Holy Babylon Wrote:  What made you pick your specific belief, I mean there are just so many different polytheistic religions out there, one for each culture pretty much. What are your basic tenets, who are your gods, how many are there, etc?

Many pre-literate peoples who were divided into many tribes, like the Celts, but also the Slavs, provide us with no one formally chiseled-out pantheon shared by all of them. It is my very strong impression is that there is a divine population on the three worlds that is probably fairly large, with individuals intent upon certain peoples, cultures, and sometimes individual mortals. It is likely that some appeared under different names to different people, but pursuing this can be a slippery slope.

I'm early in my path, and still finding out who "my" Gods are. Perun will probably always be the primary one, but I also consider Veles, Dazbog, Svarog, Srecha, and Mokosh very important.

My tenets would be what values I find echoed in the material I study; respect for the divine, the dead, and family. Also, general avoidance of harming or short-changing others, hospitality, and loyalty.
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12-19-2009, 05:40 PM
Post: #4
RE: Polytheists and Neo-Paganists
(12-19-2009 05:10 PM)Venedi Sporoi Wrote:  
(12-19-2009 02:45 PM)Holy Babylon Wrote:  What made you pick your specific belief, I mean there are just so many different polytheistic religions out there, one for each culture pretty much. What are your basic tenets, who are your gods, how many are there, etc?

Many pre-literate peoples who were divided into many tribes, like the Celts, but also the Slavs, provide us with no one formally chiseled-out pantheon shared by all of them. It is my very strong impression is that there is a divine population on the three worlds that is probably fairly large, with individuals intent upon certain peoples, cultures, and sometimes individuals. It is likely that some appeared under different names to different people, but pursuing this can be a slippery slope.

I'm early in my path, and still finding out who "my" Gods are. Perun will probably always be the primary one, but I also consider Veles, Dazbog, Svarog, Srecha, and Mokosh very important.

My tenets would be what values I find echoed in the material I study; respect for the divine, the dead, and family. Also, general avoidance of harming or short-changing others, hospitality, and loyalty where it's due.

I find Slavic Polytheism very interesting -- my best friend/cousin is a priestess of Zorya Polunochnaya. I would love to know what exactly drew you to it.
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12-19-2009, 05:45 PM
Post: #5
RE: Polytheists and Neo-Paganists
(12-19-2009 05:40 PM)Aingeal Wrote:  I find Slavic Polytheism very interesting -- my best friend/cousin is a priestess of Zorya Polunochnaya. I would love to know what exactly drew you to it.

I have been studying all sorts of religions for many years now and very recently I am seeing names here that I have never encountered before! Smile
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12-19-2009, 06:46 PM (This post was last modified: 12-19-2009 10:25 PM by Venedi Sporoi.)
Post: #6
RE: Polytheists and Neo-Paganists
(12-19-2009 05:40 PM)Aingeal Wrote:  I find Slavic Polytheism very interesting -- my best friend/cousin is a priestess of Zorya Polunochnaya. I would love to know what exactly drew you to it.
That's interesting
It's good to find someone with some interest. The pre-christian remnants of Russia, Slovakia, Poland, and other Slavic countries can be scant, and are largely folkloric. The information that does exist is inundated with modern "fakelore", and isn't widely written about in the English-speaking world. This is probably why Parousia- hello there- hasn't heard much about it.

All of these things probably seem like they'd dissuade rather than encourage me, but for me learning about Slavic myth was an enjoyable task. I started out utterly ecclectic, and gradually became obsessed with the piecing together of my ancestor's beliefs. To some degree, the belief in a Proto-Indo-European theology also made Slavic and Baltic polytheism jump out at me. I'd like to add though that my interest in that category of scholarship is of course purely religious; I'm no pan-aryanist.
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12-19-2009, 10:25 PM
Post: #7
RE: Polytheists and Neo-Paganists
(12-19-2009 06:46 PM)Venedi Sporoi Wrote:  
(12-19-2009 05:40 PM)Aingeal Wrote:  I find Slavic Polytheism very interesting -- my best friend/cousin is a priestess of Zorya Polunochnaya. I would love to know what exactly drew you to it.
That's interesting
It's good to find someone with some interest. The pre-christian remnants of Russia, Slovakia, Poland, and other Slavic countries can be scant, and are largely folkloric. The information that does exist is inundated with modern "fakelore", and isn't widely written about in the English-speaking world. and This is probably why Parousia- hello there- hasn't heard much about it.

All of these things probably seem like they'd dissuade rather than encourage me, but for me learning about Slavic myth was an enjoyable task. I started out utterly ecclectic, and gradually became obsessed with the piecing together of my ancestor's beliefs. To some degree, the belief in a Proto-Indo-European theology also made Slavic and Baltic polytheism jump out at me. I'd like to add though that my interest in that category of scholarship is of course purely religious; I'm no pan-aryanist.

So, forgive my ignorance, but how does eclecticism work within paganism? I must admit, a lot of my family are Celtic Polytheists, and on my mum's side it's straight Romani with some Baltic and Slavic Polytheism thrown in. I've never really had an experience with an Eclectic, aside from the wiccans who like to get shirty with me.
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12-19-2009, 11:44 PM (This post was last modified: 12-20-2009 07:20 PM by Venedi Sporoi.)
Post: #8
RE: Polytheists and Neo-Paganists
(12-19-2009 10:25 PM)Aingeal Wrote:  So, forgive my ignorance, but how does eclecticism work within paganism? I must admit, a lot of my family are Celtic Polytheists, and on my mum's side it's straight Romani with some Baltic and Slavic Polytheism thrown in. I've never really had an experience with an Eclectic, aside from the wiccans who like to get shirty with me.

As an eclectic, I had read largely Greek and Roman history, and had a very Greco-Roman outlook. The Athenians had a temple to the Thracian Bendis, the Romans honored Isis, and so on. I was really into near-eastern and Greek Gods, a synthesis that was once pretty common. At the same time, it didn't really feel natural. Then I discovered Slavic material, and grew more and more focused on it.

I would argue though that combining Baltic and Slavic traditions, depending on execution, is not quite "eclectic". As I touched upon before, neither culture had one formal pantheon. More importantly, there's definite overlap between the cultures in their languages, as well as traditions and deities. I think the better documented Baltic traditions can help make the Slavic practice more complete. Should the two contradict rather than compliment one another, I would stick to what's Slavic.

It sounds like you have a lot of polytheistic family members. I always wondered about polytheistic families; was there some founding relative/s who started this trend?
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12-20-2009, 04:11 PM
Post: #9
RE: Polytheists and Neo-Paganists
(12-19-2009 11:44 PM)Venedi Sporoi Wrote:  
(12-19-2009 10:25 PM)Aingeal Wrote:  So, forgive my ignorance, but how does eclecticism work within paganism? I must admit, a lot of my family are Celtic Polytheists, and on my mum's side it's straight Romani with some Baltic and Slavic Polytheism thrown in. I've never really had an experience with an Eclectic, aside from the wiccans who like to get shirty with me.

As an ecclectic, I had read largely Greek and Roman history, and had a very Greco-Roman outlook. The Athenians had a temple to the Thracian Bendis, the Romans honored Isis, and so on. I was really into near-eastern and Greek Gods, a synthesis that was once pretty common. At the same time, it didn't really feel natural. Then I discovered Slavic material, and grew more and more focused on it.

I would argue though that combining Baltic and Slavic traditions, depending on execution, is not quite "ecclectic". As I touched upon before, neither culture had one formal pantheon. More importantly, there's definite overlap between the cultures in their languages, as well as traditions and deities. I think the better documented Baltic traditions can help make the Slavic practice more complete. Should the two contradict rather than compliment one another, I would stick to what's Slavic.

It sounds like you have a lot of polytheistic family members. I always wondered about polytheistic families; was there some founding relative/s who started this trend?

I wasn't saying Baltic and Slavic made you eclectic, if that did, then all Celtic Polytheists are eclectic, between Gaul, Ireland, etc. I was asking more because you said you started out eclectic.

I do have a lot of polytheistic family. I honestly can't tell you who started it. My father and great grandfather are/were Christians, respectively, my grandmother, great grandmother, and great great grandparents on my dad's side are generally agreed upon from records to have been at least privately pagan. There's some argument about whether our records before that show that they were pagans or just witches or what. It gets complicated to draw the line a lot of the time.

As far as my mum's side, again, she was Romani (and agnostic) so there's a lot of tradition there too.
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12-21-2009, 01:45 AM
Post: #10
RE: Polytheists and Neo-Paganists
(12-20-2009 04:11 PM)Aingeal Wrote:  I wasn't saying Baltic and Slavic made you eclectic, if that did, then all Celtic Polytheists are eclectic, between Gaul, Ireland, etc. I was asking more because you said you started out eclectic.

I do have a lot of polytheistic family. I honestly can't tell you who started it. My father and great grandfather are/were Christians, respectively, my grandmother, great grandmother, and great great grandparents on my dad's side are generally agreed upon from records to have been at least privately pagan. There's some argument about whether our records before that show that they were pagans or just witches or what. It gets complicated to draw the line a lot of the time.

As far as my mum's side, again, she was Romani (and agnostic) so there's a lot of tradition there too.

I though you might not have been soon after typing. In any case though, I'm thoroughly divorced from that sort of mixing, and decided to let what I said stand. Smile

All my close family will have nothing to do with religion, and including even my most extended family only brings monotheists into the picture.I often wonder what to do with a family or children in the future. I imagine you were presented with a sort of choice from early on?
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