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Thé God - Uhhuv
11-28-2017, 09:45 AM
Post: #1
Thé God - Uhhuv
Did you know that the concept God, can be traced back to Adam, and his name of it, Dyaus, in proto-indo-europe -5200BC? It also becomes Wodanaz (Odin) in proto-germanic culture and Gudanaz in germanic culture. Our language is a germanic language, and that is why we still call it in the shortened form, "God". However to use it correctly, one must appropriate it the right semantics, such as "Thé God is without any cópartner".

Later, Yahwe (YHWH) is a concept that tries to fix regressions in religion at this time, however unfortunately still including some. (Such as two trees). It also is influenced by Buddhism that in turn is influenced by Daoism, and the typical Anattä egoless-type teachings.

I have considered all these developments and further reconstructed it as Uhhuv, The Bòss of The Cosmôs.

Using diacritical marks here, to get closer to the original expressions. Bòss for instance, is Rabb.

Some other common words/expressions:

Garden, Hellfurnace, Satanos is a flamedemon, Mentor (priestly leader), Apostle (religionprophet), Hailed Be Uhhuv (halleluyah) The Bòss Of The Cosmôs, The Beneficient, The Highly Compassionate. He has no cópartner, Angelos, Twotimer (religious hypocrite), Idolworshipper, Phárao.

What do you think, do you think it is interesting?

This is also similar to serious islamic interpretation, so a pacfiying factor in that aswell. Wouldn´t it be great if developed monotheism, became universal?

Peaceful Salutations.
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11-28-2017, 09:28 PM
Post: #2
RE: Thé God - Uhhuv
Posting here for later, but... No. Týr is derived from "deyus", not Odin.

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11-29-2017, 02:00 AM
Post: #3
RE: Thé God - Uhhuv
(11-28-2017 09:28 PM)Satyros Wrote:  Posting here for later, but... No. Týr is derived from "deyus", not Odin.

hm? Týr is a later concept, and one of the Many variations on the same.
Really the one we recognize as Wodanaz, which as I say, is derived of Dyaus.

Almost all cultures have several varations on this.

India - Dyaus, Indra
Mesopotamia, Ea, Enlil
Norway - Odin, Thor
Ancient Egypt - Atum, Osiris

So much regressions that naturally, an apostle (religionprophet) comes to say, there is just óne divine. Which was the one we call Abraham, muslims call Ibrahim, and probably was the historical person Zarathustra. Ahura Mazda, and the language of The Gathas is indeed very root-monotheistic.

This was a post about germanic culture though, and our idea of the divine. But indeed we know him as an idolrejector, and so indeed, Thé God is óne, he is without any cópartner.
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11-29-2017, 05:33 AM
Post: #4
RE: Thé God - Uhhuv
(11-29-2017 02:00 AM)Adhérant Of Uhhuv Wrote:  Týr is a later concept, and one of the Many variations on the same.
Really the one we recognize as Wodanaz, which as I say, is derived of Dyaus.

No. Old Norse Týr, literally "god", plural tívar "gods", comes from Proto-Germanic Tīwaz (Old English Tīw, Old High German Zīo), which continues Proto-Indo-European deiwós "celestial being, god" (Welsh duw, Latin deus, Lithuanian diẽvas, Sanskrit dēvá, Avestan daēvō. Deiwós is based in dei-, deyā-, dīdyā-, meaning 'to shine'.

Worship of Týr as chieftain of the Aesir predates that of Odin.

Regarding Odin, the Old Norse theonym Óðinn (popularly anglicized as Odin) and its cognates, including Old English Wōden, Old Saxon Wōden, and Old High German Wuotan, derive from the reconstructed Proto-Germanic theonym wōđanaz. The masculine noun wōđanaz developed from the Proto-Germanic adjective wōđaz, related to Latin vātēs and Old Irish fáith, both meaning 'seer, prophet'. Adjectives stemming from wōđaz include Gothic woþs 'possessed', Old Norse óðr, 'mad, frantic, furious', and Old English wōd 'mad'.


Quote:Almost all cultures have several varations on this.

India - Dyaus, Indra
Mesopotamia, Ea, Enlil
Norway - Odin, Thor

I don't know about the others, but Odin and Thor are quite different. Old Norse Þórr, Old English ðunor, Old High German Donar, Old Saxon thunar, and Old Frisian thuner are cognates within the Germanic language branch, descending from the Proto-Germanic masculine noun þunraz 'thunder'.

Your conclusions are quite erroneous, based on very flawed false-etymologies.


Quote:But indeed we know him as an idolrejector, and so indeed, Thé God is óne, he is without any cópartner.

Odd, as neither Tyr, Odin, nor Thor (distinct beings in and of themselves) have ever voiced displeasure or rejection of idols, godpoles, depictions, or co-partnership with any deity.

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11-29-2017, 06:36 AM
Post: #5
RE: Thé God - Uhhuv
(11-29-2017 05:33 AM)Satyros Wrote:  
(11-29-2017 02:00 AM)Adhérant Of Uhhuv Wrote:  Týr is a later concept, and one of the Many variations on the same.
Really the one we recognize as Wodanaz, which as I say, is derived of Dyaus.

No. Old Norse Týr, literally "god", plural tívar "gods", comes from Proto-Germanic Tīwaz (Old English Tīw, Old High German Zīo), which continues Proto-Indo-European deiwós "celestial being, god" (Welsh duw, Latin deus, Lithuanian diẽvas, Sanskrit dēvá, Avestan daēvō. Deiwós is based in dei-, deyā-, dīdyā-, meaning 'to shine'.

Worship of Týr as chieftain of the Aesir predates that of Odin.

Regarding Odin, the Old Norse theonym Óðinn (popularly anglicized as Odin) and its cognates, including Old English Wōden, Old Saxon Wōden, and Old High German Wuotan, derive from the reconstructed Proto-Germanic theonym wōđanaz. The masculine noun wōđanaz developed from the Proto-Germanic adjective wōđaz, related to Latin vātēs and Old Irish fáith, both meaning 'seer, prophet'. Adjectives stemming from wōđaz include Gothic woþs 'possessed', Old Norse óðr, 'mad, frantic, furious', and Old English wōd 'mad'.


Quote:Almost all cultures have several varations on this.

India - Dyaus, Indra
Mesopotamia, Ea, Enlil
Norway - Odin, Thor

I don't know about the others, but Odin and Thor are quite different. Old Norse Þórr, Old English ðunor, Old High German Donar, Old Saxon thunar, and Old Frisian thuner are cognates within the Germanic language branch, descending from the Proto-Germanic masculine noun þunraz 'thunder'.

Your conclusions are quite erroneous, based on very flawed false-etymologies.


Quote:But indeed we know him as an idolrejector, and so indeed, Thé God is óne, he is without any cópartner.

Odd, as neither Tyr, Odin, nor Thor (distinct beings in and of themselves) have ever voiced displeasure or rejection of idols, godpoles, depictions, or co-partnership with any deity.

Is this a polytheistic forum? Then I am in the wrong place, and will stop posting now.
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11-29-2017, 01:50 PM
Post: #6
RE: Thé God - Uhhuv
(11-29-2017 06:36 AM)Adhérant Of Uhhuv Wrote:  Is this a polytheistic forum? Then I am in the wrong place, and will stop posting now.

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11-29-2017, 02:49 PM
Post: #7
RE: Thé God - Uhhuv
(11-29-2017 06:36 AM)Adhérant Of Uhhuv Wrote:  Is this a polytheistic forum? Then I am in the wrong place, and will stop posting now.

As Herminator showed, there is a Polytheism section in the forums. Overall this is a forum for the discussion of religion, polytheism included. Certainly justified when you mention several polytheistic gods.

However theology wasn't discussed here. Very flawed etymology was.

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11-30-2017, 07:49 AM (This post was last modified: 12-01-2017 06:16 AM by Adhérant Of Uhhuv.)
Post: #8
RE: Thé God - Üddüv
(11-29-2017 02:49 PM)Satyros Wrote:  
(11-29-2017 06:36 AM)Adhérant Of Uhhuv Wrote:  Is this a polytheistic forum? Then I am in the wrong place, and will stop posting now.

As Herminator showed, there is a Polytheism section in the forums. Overall this is a forum for the discussion of religion, polytheism included. Certainly justified when you mention several polytheistic gods.

However theology wasn't discussed here. Very flawed etymology was.

No, this seems polytheistic, and your argumention purely is. If you know historical facts, all polytheism after Adam is called polytheism because they borrow qualities of the original divine. That is why they are "sons", etc or other things. Subgods or what not. They are not real, but often hallucinogenic and synasthesia related. Indeed there is just one religion and that is about Thé God, that is without any cópartners. The doctrine of Abraham.

I am changing my focus a bit, and using an even more egoless reconstruction, and is now Adhérant Of Üddüi.

And consider the thread preempted from my side.
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11-30-2017, 01:56 PM
Post: #9
RE: Thé God - Üddüv
(11-30-2017 07:49 AM)Adhérant Of Uhhuv Wrote:  No, this seems polytheistic, and your argumention purely is.

My argument is purely linguistic, and addresses the flaws in etymology that your conclusions have reached. If you can't address it then you can't, but spare us this going around in circles.

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11-30-2017, 03:07 PM
Post: #10
RE: Thé God - Uhhuv
At the top:

"All religions, arts, and sciences are branches of the same tree. All these aspirations are directed toward ennobling man's
life, lifting it from the sphere of mere physical existence and leading the individual towards freedom. -Albert Einstein-"

Ofcourse Albert was a pipesmoker, and a pantheist, so the similarity to what I was saying is merely coincidental.

Peaceful Salutations.
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