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The first to Represent my people
05-12-2008, 01:29 AM
Post: #1
Toungue The first to Represent my people
...Now where are the rest of you guys?

Believe nothing, no matter where you read it, or who said it, no matter if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense.
-Buddha
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05-13-2008, 01:40 PM
Post: #2
RE: The first to Represent my people
Hopefully more will join!

His and Your Humble Servant
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05-28-2008, 06:26 AM
Post: #3
RE: The first to Represent my people
Yo Let us talk about Buddhism here Big Grin
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04-13-2009, 07:28 PM
Post: #4
RE: The first to Represent my people
What does the planet tell you?
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07-07-2009, 02:16 AM
Post: #5
RE: The first to Represent my people
I agree with buddhism on most parts but one thing i find impossible to ignore is how can people go find self-liberation when their family is suffering? where is the moral in that? like the buddha boy of Nepal. sitting in jungle for six years to find liberation for him or the world but to ignore his family suffering in the farm all day and night is unethical. find liberation when your duties are paid off. learn to be a son before you become a father. same concept towards christian.
how can you skip out on being a son or daughter and be a father to the faith?
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07-07-2009, 08:48 AM
Post: #6
RE: The first to Represent my people
Oh good! We have a Buddhist actually posting. I know a little about Buddhism, and I'd love to learn more.

I'm back baby! Thanks for everyone who sent me PMs asking what had happened to me.
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07-10-2009, 03:14 PM
Post: #7
RE: The first to Represent my people
(07-07-2009 08:48 AM)GTseng3 Wrote:  Oh good! We have a Buddhist actually posting. I know a little about Buddhism, and I'd love to learn more.

same here i'm trying to catch up on the missing history of my ancestors. my ancestors were confucianism and buddhism before the french introduced christianity to my country... you can say im searching into my roots.. as far as buddhism goes, i like the theory and metaphors in the belief. i do realize the mind is more powerful than a gun but but can be nurtured to be as gentle as feather..
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03-02-2010, 03:57 PM
Post: #8
RE: The first to Represent my people
"First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win"

Cuban cigars | Habanos | Cigars
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06-10-2010, 02:02 AM
Post: #9
RE: The first to Represent my people
(07-07-2009 02:16 AM)friendofafriend Wrote:  I agree with buddhism on most parts but one thing i find impossible to ignore is how can people go find self-liberation when their family is suffering? where is the moral in that? like the buddha boy of Nepal. sitting in jungle for six years to find liberation for him or the world but to ignore his family suffering in the farm all day and night is unethical. find liberation when your duties are paid off. learn to be a son before you become a father. same concept towards christian.
how can you skip out on being a son or daughter and be a father to the faith?

I think we have a modern term for it: cop-out. In a hot climate people who can afford to tend to drift-off, while the women do the chores in the hot and sweatty kitchen.
My work is with parapsychology and reincarnation. I have established that telepathy is the universal means of communication. This is how the fetus in the vomb communicates with his mother, this is how God communicates. Dreams are telepathy is the sleeping state.
People on Earth are reborn once approx. in a thousand years. So, our short lives here are but a fraction of our entire lives, and family relations on Earth may or may not be the permanent ones. When we die we return to that other world to continue our lives there, interrupted by this sojourn to Earthy existence. We recover our memories, what we have learnt, reunited with family.
The Buddha.
I worked out the previous lives on Earth of a large number of historical persons, Buddha among them. I established that the Buddha has lived on Earth at the time of Jesus' birth, and to Christians became known as one of the wise men who visited Jesus' family. He was reborn again as the Mahatma Gandhi, our contemporary. In the world beyond he is one of God's six children, the others being Jesus, Moses, Mohamed, Dalai Lama and Pope John XXIII, who is actually a woman there. (could not have become a pope unless she was born a man).
More info re my study is on my website http://www.ThinkTankGraphics.ca
Kathie Bondar
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06-10-2010, 08:42 AM (This post was last modified: 06-10-2010 10:09 AM by digipixel.)
Post: #10
RE: The first to Represent my people
(07-07-2009 02:16 AM)friendofafriend Wrote:  I agree with buddhism on most parts but one thing i find impossible to ignore is how can people go find self-liberation when their family is suffering? where is the moral in that? like the buddha boy of Nepal. sitting in jungle for six years to find liberation for him or the world but to ignore his family suffering in the farm all day and night is unethical. find liberation when your duties are paid off. learn to be a son before you become a father. same concept towards christian.
how can you skip out on being a son or daughter and be a father to the faith?

I realize I am responding to a very old post, but I am surprised no one bothered to address this:

According to Buddhist tradition, the "Buddha boy" of Nepal, Siddhartha Gautama, came from the ruling class and his family was very wealthy. While his family probably missed him greatly after his departure to find enlightenment, the Buddha left no one behind to suffer "on the farm" in terms of physical hardships. To the contrary, he gave up great wealth and luxury.

And you may have missed the point. Part of the Buddha's enlightement was to "discover" that all of the world is suffering, and that much of that suffering is of our on doing through attachment to material posessions, desire, unbridled passion and through our own ego.

Unless you intend to become a Buddhist monk or a nun, practical Buddhism (for individuals like you and me) does not require us to abandon our families and live the life of an impoverished hermit. Rather, we can practice what the Buddha taught and still be a part of everyday life. This engaged Buddhism provides an opportunity to live a life that demonstrates Buddha's teachings, so that we become actively engaged in relieving suffering in the world.
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