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Why Islam
02-11-2009, 01:34 AM
Post: #1
Why Islam
Islam is much more than a formal religion: it is an integral way of life.In many ways it is a more a determining factor in the experience of its followers than any other world religion.

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02-11-2009, 04:50 PM
Post: #2
RE: Why Islam
i can be suicide bomber? i can fly airplanes into buildings? i get free ak-47 from my leaders?
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02-12-2009, 04:57 AM
Post: #3
RE: Why Islam
(02-11-2009 04:50 PM)B MAN Wrote:  i can be suicide bomber? i can fly airplanes into buildings? i get free ak-47 from my leaders?
No my friend, these are not the teachings of Islam. These all are misled information propagated internationally.
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02-12-2009, 05:10 AM
Post: #4
RE: Why Islam
islam does not clean the inside of your cup,only Christ does.only when you sort yourself out and not fully dress your women,to stop being tempted.i have nothing against good people,but the truth is Christ.

Good evil salvation
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02-12-2009, 05:03 PM
Post: #5
RE: Why Islam
(02-12-2009 04:57 AM)Plexuspk Wrote:  
(02-11-2009 04:50 PM)B MAN Wrote:  i can be suicide bomber? i can fly airplanes into buildings? i get free ak-47 from my leaders?
No my friend, these are not the teachings of Islam. These all are misled information propagated internationally.
but b man wants to be big hero. b man wants to be martyr. b man wants 72 virgins in heaven. b man get those things by blowing up subway, no?
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03-16-2009, 07:09 AM
Post: #6
RE: Why Islam
Some Islamic Principles.

A. Oneness of God:

He is One and the Only One. He is not two in one or three in one. This means that Islam rejects the idea of trinity or such a unity of Cod which implies more than one God in one.

B. Oneness of mankind:

People are created equal in front of the Law of God. There is no superiority for one race over another. God made us of different colors, nationalities, languages and beliefs so as to test who is going to be better than others. No one can claim that he is better than others. It is only God Who knows who is better. It depends on piety and righteousness.

C. Oneness of Messengers and the Message:

Muslims believe that God sent different messengers throughout the history of mankind. All came with the same message and the same teachings. It was the people who misunderstood and misinterpreted them.

Muslims believe in Noah, Abraham, Isaac, Ismail, Jacob, Moses, David, Jesus, and Muhammad. The Prophets of Christianity and Judaism are indeed the Prophets of Islam.

D. Angels and the Day of Judgement:

Muslims believe that there are unseen creatures such as angels created by God in the universe for special missions.

Muslims believe that there is a Day of Judgement when all people of the world throughout the history of mankind till the last day of life on earth, are to be brought for accounting, reward and punishment.

E. With Non-Muslims.

Muslims are required to respect all those who are faithful and God conscious people, namely those who received messages. Christians and Jews are called People of the Book. Muslims are asked to call upon the People of the Book for common terms, namely, to worship One God, and to work together for the solutions of the many problems in the society.

Christians and Jews lived peacefully with Muslims throughout centuries in the Middle East and other Asian and African countries. The second Caliph Umar did not pray in the church in Jerusalem so as not to give the Muslims an excuse to take it over. Christians entrusted the Muslims, and as such the key of the Church in Jerusalem is still in the hands of the Muslims.

Jews fled from Spain during the Inquisition, and they were welcomed by the Muslims. They settled in the heart of the Islamic Caliphate. They enjoyed positions of power and authority.

Throughout the Muslim world, churches, synagogues and missionary schools were built within the Muslim neighborhoods. These places were protected by Muslims even during the contemporary crises in the Middle East.
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03-22-2009, 01:54 AM
Post: #7
RE: Why Islam
Sesame -
Your part "A" - This is irrelevent. Just because Islam rejects the trinity only proves that Islams don't worship the same God as Jews and Christians.
Your part "b" - So you are saying that Islam is a works based faith then? In Christianity and Judaism, all people are evil and that is because God is the standard and all mankind falls short of His standard.
Your part "C" - 100 percent false. Islam faith doesn't agree with who those people are according to Judaism and Christianity. The Hebrew text or Greek texts don't even mention muslim prophet. Perhaps you could make an argument that Muslims are descended from Abraham - through Ishmael, but I don't know why you would because the bible is clear that Ishmael did not recieve Gods blessing.
Your part "D" - This is actually quite scary......how can a man stand before a perfect God wondering if he did what was required. This is a good one for "why not Islam"
Your part "e"- this ideal may be practiced in the USA, but in the middle east, it is not.

All in all, it feels like there is a good case against Islam, rather than for Islam.
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03-23-2009, 09:25 AM
Post: #8
RE: Why Islam
A. Actually, there are a large number of Christians who reject the trinity. Judaism completely rejects the trinity. The oneness of God is far from a Muslim invention, Christians tout it all the time to combat assertions that God, Jesus, and the Holy Spirit are actually separate entities rather than aspects of a whole.

B. Again, many Christian sects are works-based in a sense. They believe faith in Christ is necessary, but they also believe that works must be done. The book of James, especially, espouses this view when it says "faith without works is dead" and other such verses. In the Old Testament, basis of Judaism, it's very clear that good works are expected, and the sacrificial system was implemented to redeem bad works.

C. My understanding is Islam only disagrees with the Christian interpretation of Jesus Christ. Coincidentally, Judaism also disagrees with the Christian interpretation of Jesus Christ. Furthermore, Ishmael did receive God's blessing. That's made very clear in Genesis, Ishmael is given a very strong blessing by God and said he would found a powerful people. What he did not receive was the birthright of the first born, putting him in the line of succession to Jesus (Issac took that from him because Abraham, or possibly God, was racist.) Muslims believe that the great men of the Bible were prophets of Islam, just as most Christians believe that these men were divinely inspired by God (and in some cases, were types, or prophetic examples, of Christ).

D. Actually I find the idea of being judged based on your merits rather empowering. That's one big reason why I'm an atheist, but that's not germane to the discussion. Christians too believe in a judgment, where even Christians will be judged by God. Most sects (but not all) believe that the only determining factor on getting to heaven is belief in Christ, but pretty much everyone agrees that your heavenly reward depends on the works you have done, and how you have lived your life. So really, there's not much difference there.

E. Actually during the glory days of the Islamic Caliphate Sesame is absolutely right, Jews and Christians (and other religions) were allowed to live with a surprising degree of tolerance. They were forced to pay significantly higher taxes, since Islam was the state religion, and they were not allowed to proselytize anyone or spread their religion, but they were allowed to practice their religion among themselves. That ideal of cooperation lasted for a long time, until the Crusades, and even after the Crusades the Muslims continued to allow Christians and Jews to make pilgrimages to the holy land. The current animosity of Muslims toward Jews and Christians has as much to do with having their land stolen in 1948 than anything. Granted, there are historical tensions between these peoples, but it was really the creation of Israel as a nation, carved out by the UN from Muslim territory, that caused the current problems.

Islam has the same God, and the same basic principles as Judaism and Christianity. That's obvious to anyone who's studied the faith. And, in this atheist's opinion, it says something about that God when the greatest violence of religious animosity in the world comes from two religions who both follow Him. Few religions even approach the sectarian violence of the People of the Book.
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03-24-2009, 05:45 AM (This post was last modified: 03-24-2009 05:52 AM by Pilgrim.)
Post: #9
RE: Why Islam
GTseng Wrote:Again, many Christian sects are works-based in a sense. They believe faith in Christ is necessary, but they also believe that works must be done. The book of James, especially, espouses this view when it says "faith without works is dead" and other such verses. In the Old Testament, basis of Judaism, it's very clear that good works are expected, and the sacrificial system was implemented to redeem bad works.
If you're refering to Millerite derivatives and other cult movements that claim the name Christian but actually preach & teach heresy then they are not nor have ever been Christian and cannot be defined as such. In the same way that Islam cannot, simply because it acknowledges Jesus as a Prophet of God but ignores His teachings and claims concerning Himself.

If you read James carefully you will note quite quickly that the only two examples given of those who did good works were Abraham who went straightways to sacrifice his son because he believed God and a prostitute named Rahab who gave shelter to the spies sent by the Hebrews giving them information about the city because it was in fear of them by reason of their God.

Works in this understanding are not defined as working in soup kitchens or hospitals, unless that is the command of God specifically to a specific individual believer. Works are not a method of earning God's approval in Christianity but the fruit visible of an existing relationship.

They are learning to live in a living relationship with God and personal obedience to Him in your personal walk. Christians first achieve this by believing in the sacrifice of Christ and accepting the free gift of salvation by this medium.

Not by observing a lot of rules & regulations or sacrificing animals since Jesus has been sacrificed once and for all for sin. Thus the Word says, 'To obey is better than sacrifice.' The conflict between Islam & Christianity comes down not to whether it is the same God but what God requires of men and it is in the differences of approach that these are seen. Much like Cain & Abel will I give God what He requires as He requires it? Or will I bring my own understanding & do it my way?

As for me & my house?

"Love is not a feeling, it's an act of your will." Don Francisco.
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03-24-2009, 09:26 AM
Post: #10
RE: Why Islam
I was actually referring to more mainstream Christianity. The Catholic tradition of purgatory is a good example, but most Christians I know of believe works are important. Not vital to get to heaven, but vital to secure a heavenly reward. And, as James says, "Faith without works is dead."

But we're getting off topic, I was talking about how Christianity compares with Islam. They are part of the same group of religions, all following the same God.
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