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was jesus really a jew?
07-06-2017, 06:39 PM (This post was last modified: 07-06-2017 06:46 PM by Caesar Saladin.)
Post: #121
RE: was jesus really a jew?
How about this: Let the Jews decide if Jesus was one of them. They have their standards of inclusion and regardless what anyone else says, if the Jews say you're not a Jew and you don't meet the qualifications, guess what? You're not a Jew. You can be Jew-ish and follow the Jewish religion, but can't BE a Jew unless they say so.

Personally, given that both Jesus' parents were Jewish, I think that's a pretty big indicator that Jesus himself was Jewish. Whether he followed 'the rules' or not in later life is irrelevant. (Although we are told that Jesus celebrated Passover with the disciples prior to going to the Garden of Gethsemane- why would Jesus, or any of the disciples for that matter- celebrate Passover if they weren't Jewish? That's just one example pointing to the answer.)

When someone asks "What would Jesus do?" remind them that flipping tables and chasing people with a whip is entirely possible.
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07-07-2017, 10:20 AM
Post: #122
RE: was jesus really a jew?
(07-06-2017 06:39 PM)Caesar Saladin Wrote:  How about this: Let the Jews decide if Jesus was one of them. They have their standards of inclusion and regardless what anyone else says, if the Jews say you're not a Jew and you don't meet the qualifications, guess what? You're not a Jew. You can be Jew-ish and follow the Jewish religion, but can't BE a Jew unless they say so.

Personally, given that both Jesus' parents were Jewish, I think that's a pretty big indicator that Jesus himself was Jewish. Whether he followed 'the rules' or not in later life is irrelevant. (Although we are told that Jesus celebrated Passover with the disciples prior to going to the Garden of Gethsemane- why would Jesus, or any of the disciples for that matter- celebrate Passover if they weren't Jewish? That's just one example pointing to the answer.)

Here is a factoid for you: The word Jew originally meant somebody who was born as a citizen of Judea. So, whether because he was born in Judea, or because he practised the religion of his contemporaries, Jesus was a Jew.

If I wanted to get into an argument where anachronisms were just fine, then I suppose I would try claiming that Jesus was a good Christian.
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07-07-2017, 10:57 AM
Post: #123
RE: was jesus really a jew?
(07-07-2017 10:20 AM)Anglican Wrote:  
(07-06-2017 06:39 PM)Caesar Saladin Wrote:  How about this: Let the Jews decide if Jesus was one of them. They have their standards of inclusion and regardless what anyone else says, if the Jews say you're not a Jew and you don't meet the qualifications, guess what? You're not a Jew. You can be Jew-ish and follow the Jewish religion, but can't BE a Jew unless they say so.

Personally, given that both Jesus' parents were Jewish, I think that's a pretty big indicator that Jesus himself was Jewish. Whether he followed 'the rules' or not in later life is irrelevant. (Although we are told that Jesus celebrated Passover with the disciples prior to going to the Garden of Gethsemane- why would Jesus, or any of the disciples for that matter- celebrate Passover if they weren't Jewish? That's just one example pointing to the answer.)

Here is a factoid for you: The word Jew originally meant somebody who was born as a citizen of Judea. So, whether because he was born in Judea, or because he practised the religion of his contemporaries, Jesus was a Jew.

If I wanted to get into an argument where anachronisms were just fine, then I suppose I would try claiming that Jesus was a good Christian.
actually, the word developed from the Hebrew Yehudi -- that was initially a name (in Jeremiah). Then, in Zecharia, the term referred to someone who followed the religion endorsed by the prophet, i.e. what we now call Judaism.

Yehudi next appears in the scroll of Esther to refer to someone who is both of the kingdom of Judah and is an adherent to that particular religious code.

In the plural, Yehudim, the word appears in Jeremiah to refer to the people of the kingdom of Judah who were subject to the laws of God (i.e. Judaism). Similar information is in Kings 2. The label (for those of Judah who follow God's law) is also discussed in Nechemia.

In terms of development into English, here:

----------------------
late 12c., Giw, Jeu, "a Jew (ancient or modern), one of the Jewish race or religion," from Anglo-French iuw, Old French giu (Modern French Juif), from Latin Iudaeum (nominative Iudaeus), from Greek Ioudaios, from Aramaic (Semitic) jehudhai (Hebrew y'hudi) "a Jew," from Y'hudah "Judah," literally "celebrated," name of Jacob's fourth son and of the tribe descended from him.

Spelling with J- predominated from 16c. Replaced Old English Iudeas "the Jews," which is from Latin.

http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=jew
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